UK GREEN ENERGY PUTS CONSUMERS OUT OF POCKET

     SIR, Ben Goldsmith (Letters, May 4) claims that climate policies are not pushing up energy bills.   He obviously is not aware that, according to the Office for Budget Responsibility, subsidies for green energy will cost £9.1billion this year, and will rise to £14.3.billion by 2020.  To that figure must be added £11 billion for the smart meter rollout.  All of this must be paid for by consumers.

Mr. Goldsmith also claims that wind power, along with gas, is now the cheapest form of electricity.  Could he explain why wind farms still require large subsidies, rather than competing on the open market? - - -Paul Homewood, Sheffield, South Yorkshire.

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RITUALISED SERMONS, CEREMONIES AND PRAYERS

     Aren’t you tired beyond belief of government’s annual “ritualised sermons, ceremonies and main prayer” (as The Australian editorial, 9 May 2017 puts it) as Budget time has once more come upon us?  The Editorial reads:

“Budget set to bank our future on better growth”“It has become a ritual. We know the sermons, ceremonies and the main prayer. We put ourselves through it and we always hope for better. But we know that almost certainly we will return to the same rites and promises a year later when, again, we will have fallen short of expectations. So we will offer a similar prayer for the year after that.”

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BANK OF ENGLAND: BONDS, REDEMPTION AND…. BONDAGE?

     While we may all be sick and tired of the ‘guff’ the mainstream media continuously feeds to us it is way past time we took on our own responsibility for the state of affairs this nation is now labouring under.  This website has more than enough information-–along with some important historical facts—on why we are in such a financial mess.

     So please, don’t whinge about the state of the nation if you are not going to play your part in its redemption.  First, study carefully the historical background of the banking system and grasp clearly why the banking system has such control over our nation’s financial affairs.

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AND NOW TO AUSTRALIA AND ITS DEBTS AND BONDAGE

Taken from the original “Story of the Commonwealth Bank” by F.J. Amos, 9th edition:Read the full story by F.J. Amos here….https://alor.org/Library/Amos%20DJ%20-%20Commonwealth%20Bank.pdf Mr. Amos writes:

     “The Story of the Commonwealth Bank” was originally delivered as a lecture before the  Sturt Electoral Committee, Adelaide, and was first printed in pamphlet form in 1931.  It exhibited the usual defect of all lectures, namely, condensation of the subject matter to an extreme degree.  The great and unexpected demand which arose for the pamphlet found me so closely occupied in other work that the second and third editions had to be printed practically unaltered, and I began to be more and more sensible of the need for amplifications and additions.

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Goldmann Sachs — bigger than fossil fuel in the climate debate

We can’t blame Goldmann Sachs. It’s just good business. Ref: http://joannenova.com.au/2017/05/goldmann-sachs-bigger-than-fossil-fuel-in-the-climate-debate/Goldmann Sachs pours money into lefty causes and politicians of both stripes. The gifts to left-wing flagships like climate change and same-sex marriage buy protection from the anti-bank Occupy crowd. And climate propaganda is doubly useful — Goldmann Sachs can invest and profit from government largess. And these are very big biccies – -in 2009 Goldmann Sachs announced it would spend $150 billion on green energy by 2020.

The message to non-left causes is that if you want to get multimillion dollar philanthropic funds, mobilize people and march in the street. When Goldmann is afraid of what you might do against their bonuses or profits they might get interested in your cause too.

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The Universal Lesson of East Timor By John Pilger


Ref: http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/

Filming undercover in East Timor in 1993 I followed a landscape of crosses: great black crosses etched against the sky, crosses on peaks, crosses marching down the hillsides, crosses beside the road. They littered the earth and crowded the eye.   The inscriptions on the crosses revealed the extinction of whole families, wiped out in the space of a year, a month, a day.  Village after village stood as memorials.

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EXCHANGE ON THE POWER OF BANKS TO CREATE NATION’S MONEY SUPPLY

Interested New Zealanders have been discussing the story which appeared in the New Zealand ‘Herald’ recently:“Bryan Gould: Brash doesn’t seem to understand banking” Friday Apr 28, 2017http://www.nzherald.co.nz/opinion/news/article.cfm?c_id=466&objectid=11845670.

Bill Daly explained:  Brash was NZ Reserve Bank Governor a few years ago. Bryan Gould NZ born was a UK Labour member of parliament at one time and more recently associated with one of the NZ Universities.Accused by Don Brash of “peddling nonsense” Bryan Gould responded:It is no surprise a former Governor of the Reserve Bank should seek to defend the banking system from its critics. But in denying the accuracy of points I made in the Herald about how the banks operate, Don Brash accused me of “peddling nonsense”.

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YOU DON’T MODIFY SOMETHING THAT IS FUNDAMENTALLY SOUND By Wallace Klinck, Canada

Often certain advocates of Social Credit, frustrated in their ability to progress in gaining converts and adherents, look for some way of “modernizing” Douglas’s ideas to bring them “up to date” for purposes of gaining public appeal.  Sometimes these proponents of “updating” Social Credit to increase “public acceptance” are sincere, sometimes themselves not clear in their understanding of the meaning and intent of Social Credit policy--and sometimes are agents of disruption intent deliberately upon sabotaging Douglas’s ideas.   My response is as follows:

“Why would you want to modify the Social Credit philosophy and policy?  Social Credit was an idea whose time had come a century ago, when the evermore capital intensive industrial age was effecting profound economic and social change, and has become more relevant and applicable with the passage of time.  You don’t modify something that is fundamentally sound just because people may not understand it.  Reality is reality.  We simply must educate people in an effort to help them come to an understanding of actuality.  We are assisted in this with every replacement of human effort by technology.

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Charles Ferguson’s 'The Great News' (1915)

This article stemmed from reading a paper written by an Indian chap on a proposal for a National Dividend for India.  An excellent paper, it has just one small historical error:  from his readings, the chap believed that A.R. Orage coined the term ‘social credit’ which was published in an edition of 'The New Age'. Historically, this was not so, and historical accuracy is important, so this error will be corrected.But it did send me back to Charles Ferguson’s 'The Great News' (1915).

Fellow American Michael Lane researched the life of Charles Ferguson, originally published in Triumph of the Past January to June, 2002 and republished by the Australian Heritage Society as 'Charles Ferguson: Herald of Social Credit'.Bill Daly of the New Zealand League of Rights wrote an Introduction to Michael Lane’s book and had this to say:

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MYTHS, LEGENDS AND SPIRITUAL SURVIVAL by Betty Luks October 2007

Ref: http://www.alor.org/NewTimes%20Survey/Myths%20Legends%20and%20Spiritual%20Survival.htmI recently came upon a copy of Sir Edward “Weary” Dunlop’s “War Diaries” published forty years after WWII. Sir Edward was one of Australia’s great heroes. In the foreword British officer, Colonel Sir Laurens van der Post wrote of his brief experiences with the American and Australian soldiers of war, along with the British, in the early days of the Japanese internment and he described prison life as “the war within the War”.

For the first three months and under the inspired leadership of (then) Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Dunlop, an all out effort was made to not only invest the resources available to them for “the physical well being” of the men, and to unite them as of the British-Commonwealth, but a “vast educational system was set up” to cater for their mental and spiritual well being. To aid in their “physical survival and spiritual sanity”, the officers set up schools, classes and lectures, even a microcosm of a *Commonwealth parliament in prison.

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A Book Review of Social Credit Economics

In this book review of M. Oliver Heydorn’s book “Social Credit Economics”, Arindam Basu noted:

“As befits his Catholic background, Dr. Heydorn occasionally stresses the Christian philosophy underlying Social Credit. However, as David Astle has shown in his classic work, “The Babylonian Woe”, the battle between the money power and mankind long predates the advent of Christianity. Indeed, it is but one theatre of the age-old struggle between centralization and decentralization, subversion and tradition, monotheism and polytheism, - and in the final analysis, subservience and independence.Or as Lord Acton put it:“The issue which has swept down the centuries and which will have to be fought sooner or later is the people versus the banks.”Seen from this perspective, Social Credit Economics is a most valuable weapon in the people’s arsenal.”

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NPP and AUSTRALIA AS A ‘CASHLESS’ SOCIETY

On 27 March 2017, ABC News reported:“In 2014, 12 financial institutions signed up to build the NPP, (New Payment Platform…ed) partly as a way of bringing Australia up to speed with other countries that are ahead in the race to becoming completely cashless.Sweden is on track to become the world’s first completely cashless economy, and just last November India got rid of its highest denomination bills, effectively eliminating 90 per cent of its paper money.  Professor Holden estimates Australia could be cash free as early as 2020…”

Am I the only one who sees the centralizing dangers in Australia becoming ‘a cashless society’ under the present financial policies? According to Michael Edwards on ABC AM, 27 March 2017:“The Reserve Bank is introducing new technology this year which will push Australia even further towards being a cashless society.Later this year the bank will roll out a new system called the New Payment Platform (NPP).  The NPP will mean money can be transferred almost instantaneously, even when the payer and payee are members of different banks.  (Please note this sentence is about ‘credit’ – not physical money.  That is, ‘money’ in the form of ‘blips on a computer’.)

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IT IS IN PEACETIME CIVILISATION FAILS

It was in 1926 that C.H. Douglas first wrote, “In war-time, therefore, civilisation does not fail.  It is in peace time that it fails.”  That statement was repeated in August 1940 - found here http://www.alor.org/The%20Social%20Crediter/Volume%204/The%20Social%20Crediter%20Vol%204%20No%2021%20August%203%201940.pdf)

As the world forces bring us once more to the brink of war, this time a devastating nuclear war, it is worth considering his message written so long ago:

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‘ECONOMIC POLICY’ AND ‘GOOD WORKS’ by Wallace Klinck

I am reminded of Wallace Klinck’s response to a fellow Canadian who was defending Christians’ involved in ‘many good works’ within their communities.

Wallace’s words speak for themselves:

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THEFT BY CONVERSION – OR FRAUD?

A discussion taking place among the Social Credit discussion group is centred on the idea that the banking system’s credit creation system (creating money out of thin air) is fraud or theft by conversion? Most of the participants are in America and Canada so the discussion centres around the laws of those two countries.

D…. writes:

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THEY DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE PROBLEM ‘Service Not Self’ – C.H. Douglas, 1949

Amongst the more repellent forms of bilge with which the Socialist era is connected, is its claim to represent “Service, not Self.”

We neither forget nor overlook such men as Maurice, Kingsley, Ruskin, and with certain reservations, Keir Hardie. They were good and great men, and their fatal defect (much more fatal than culpable) was that they did not understand the problem with which they wished to deal.

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REVISITING MAJOR DOUGLAS’ SOCIAL CREDIT THEORY

“I am certainly not here as a moralist; but as an engineer. I have an appreciation of the importance of foundations. I find it incredible that a stable society can persist founded on the most colossal lucrative fraud that has ever been perpetrated on society”. - - C. H. Douglas, 1936 THE STUDENT ECONOMIC REVIEW VOL. XXVIIIntroduction, Senior SophisterMONETARY THOUGHT

The name of Clifford Hugh Douglas (or Major Douglas, as he was more commonly known) will not be familiar to many students of economics, but the economic writings of this engineer are of great relevance in coming to terms with what Keynes (1936: 371) labelled ‘the outstanding problem of our economic system’: the problem of deficient demand.

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Planned Obsolescence or the Death Date by Jas. Guthrie

Having recently designed and constructed a rainwater reticulation system for our home, we saw many instances of  “designed obsolescence” which resulted in “environmental vandalism”. Perfectly functional components, which we still had from previous water projects, were no longer suitable, nor interchangeable with the new standard, so were rendered obsolete. Wall thicknesses of the pipes were also changed so they were also rendered obsolete. What a waste, and all because the financial system is inherently flawed and will not allow us, as the community, the ability to purchase what we make.The manufacturer reduces the life cycle of his products in order to sell more  - whether we want them or not.

As others have said, the farmer grows a ton of potatoes but does not create the money needed to buy them. So it is with all manufacturers and producers.This policy of engineered obsolescence has been going on for a long time. Douglas wrote about it one hundred years ago in his books Economic Democracy, The Monopoly of Credit, and Social Credit, calling it "economic sabotage". In 1963 Jas. Guthrie wrote about it in his article Planned Obsolescence or the Death Date in The Social Crediter. In his article he makes reference to the well-documented book The Waste Makers (Pelican, 1963, First published in USA 1960). We present the article now for your interest.

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The Death Pledge by Will Waite

Ref: http://socialcredit.com.au/social-credit-angles/entry/77-the-death-pledgeYou should probably know that the literal meaning of mortgage is ‘death pledge’. According to the Australian debt clock we owe 1,647,386,800,000 dollars to banks as housing debt. It's about 90% of all household debt in this country and it is accumulating faster than GDP. In its March 2017 Monetary Policy Meeting the Reserve Bank noted that household debt was rising faster than household income.

It is usually the public’s want of restraint that is blamed for the worsening private debt problem; hedonistic public needs to tighten its belt and stop living beyond its means. Bad, pampered public. Mainstream reporting on Australia’s private debt level goes out of its way to avoid making clear one crucial aspect of what is driving it. This money that people are borrowing is required to run the economy. We have explored in detail how the money we use everyday is created by banks when people borrow. The primary concern of finance is how to induce people to borrow enough money to keep the economic system jerking along. The fact is if we didn’t borrow so much money we’d be berated for lack of faith (confidence in financial terms) and the economic pundits would be decrying the next round of crisis, depression, recession, downturn or whatever word their employer's banker told them to use.

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Social Credit USA 2017 - A Monetary System for all Americans (Australians-ed) by M. Oliver Heydorn

Isn’t it about time that we had a financial system that worked for all Americans? The Social Credit proposals of the engineer, Clifford Hugh Douglas, explain the kind of monetary reform that needs to be implemented in order to fix our current dysfunctional debt system.

1. In economics, the common good consists in this: all of the members of a society are able to obtain the goods and services that they need to survive and flourish with the minimum consumption of material resources and of human labour.

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